McMurrough!

Finally completed McMurrough from my previous post on Painting Plaid! In every painters queue there’s one project (or a dozen in my case) that never seems to get finished. Well this pooch  has been squatting in my painting docket for a couple years and it feels good to wrap it up. I was intimidated by the plaid and a bit uninspired for a good color layout that would fit with the rest of my army.  Finally, I just gave my self a deadline which I missed by a few days anyway. 😛 Sometimes you have to stop over-analyzing and force yourself to finish. Are there a few things that I might have done differently? Sure, but who cares! So without further delay here he is.

The following excerpt is from the Corvus Belli website. Enjoy!

“Buaidh No Bas” (“Victory or Death”). McMurrough’s Scottish Gaelic motto.

McMurrough is a Dog-Warrior of Fortune, the fiercest private contractor you will find in the mercenary market. Now he is trapped in his Dog-Warrior shape, unable to return to his Dogface form, and carries an illegal Templar sword, a smart weapon with a built-in AI. How did McMurrough end up in this situation and what does the Hassassin Society have to do with it? This is something you will find in the upcoming Infinity Campaign Book!

If you’d like to learn about McMurrough’s story, click here. Thanks for reading and as always happy painting!

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Painting Plaid

“In learning you will teach, and in teaching you will learn.”
― Phil Collins

I’ve always enjoyed teaching and motivating others to improve their skills. If you’re any good at anything, don’t be greedy with that knowledge. I say share it with the world and you’ll be better for it! So, this year I started teaching private paint lessons to fellow hobbyists in my local gaming club. It’s been a great experience and I hope my Padawans have gained as much from it as I have.

Recently, one of my students started work on a sci-fi, Caledonian-themed army for Infinity by Corvus Belli. The most challenging technique in this project is the heavy use of tartan patterns. So in this post I thought I’d share with you a simple way of creating a tartan pattern for your kilt wearing, bad ass Scotsmen. Here we go! 🙂

FYI, the Caledonian Confederacy were a group of indigenous peoples of what is now Scotland during the Iron Age and Roman eras. Thanks Wikipedia!

McMurroughPlaid

As with most paint projects, it pays to start off with some sort of plan. I created the graphic above to illustrate what a plaid looks like close up. A few things you’ll notice is that there’s a primary color in the background (in this case medium blue) and three  secondary colors (navy, orange and white). There are only a few places where colors intersect to give you a 100% saturation the rest are 50/50. Keep in mind that Tartans come in all sorts of patterns and color combos, but for simplicity’s sake and clarity on the tabletop, this is as complicated as I recommend taking the design. Now that I have a plan, lets get to painting!


Paints used:
• Reaper MSP Deep Ocean
• Reaper MSP Marine Teal
• Reaper MSP Surf Aqua
• Reaper MSP Blue Liner
• Reaper MSP Fire Orange
• Reaper MSP Pure White

Brushes used:
• Windsor Newton Series 7 #1
• Windsor Newton Series 7 #0


For this tutorial we’re using another model from the Infinity line, McMurrough! Yessiree, it’s everyone’s favorite, chain rifle-toting, furry, friend! Start off by base-coating the kilt with Marine Teal then shading it with Deep Ocean and finally highlight with Surf Aqua. The transitions don’t need to be perfectly blended because most of it will be covered up by the rest of the pattern.
Next, using the #1 brush lay out a navy grid using Blue Liner. In this case each stripe in the grid is about two brush-widths thick and four brush-widths apart but you’ll have to adjust your design on smaller models. Fabric can be tricky to paint so use references of striped and plaid skirts to better understand how the pattern should flow on the garment. For example, on McMurrough’s kilt I tapered the stripes and their spacing towards his waistline where the fabric cinches under the belt.

Other tips to keep in mind:
• Keep your paint watered down (especially when using the Liners)
• Relax and take your time creating the grid
• Be neat and make sure to have plenty of lighting
• If you make a mistake simply wipe it off quickly with a wet napkin and try again


Now it’s time to break up those heavy blue stripes with some orange ones. Using a 30/70 mix of Blue Liner/Fire Orange and the #1 brush, paint on the next set of stripes one brush-width thick along the center of the previous ones. Again, take your time and keep the paint watered down. It’ll take two or three light coats to get nice coverage, but it’s better than clumping on thick paint and making a mess of things.


At the intersections paint on pure orange in tiny rectangles using the #0 brush. Now this pattern is really coming together. If we wanted to, we could stop here and have a totally convincing and attractive tartan. However let’s kick it up a notch with one more pop of color. Overachiever!


To tie it all together and break up all that blue lets add some Pure White. Again using the #0 brush, apply watered down paint between the other stripes. Oh boy that’s looking slick as ice.


Following that, add some pure white straight out of the bottle to the intersections. And there you have it folks! A lovely tartan to make the most grizzled Scotsman smile. 😀 Now if you’ll excuse me, I have to finish giving McMurrough a proper paint job. Check back next week for pictures of the final product! Thanks for reading and as always, if you enjoyed this post please share it or post a comment!

FYI: I used Reaper Master Series Paints in this tutorial, however these techniques can be used with any paint line. The one thing I have to recommend however are the Reaper MSP Liners. I use them for freehand, line shading, washes and occasionally base-coating. They’re fantastic and a staple to my painting diet. Take a look at some of the items I suggested below via my Amazon Affiliate links. You pay nothing extra and Amazon kicks back a little something for me. Win win!

MMP-Logo[amazon_link asins=’B07664WJ3H,B001BRBPTQ,B01N9CO46G,B01NAEA1YC’ template=’ProductCarousel’ store=’//rcm-na.amazon-adsystem.com/e/cm?o=1&p=12&l=ur1&category=artscrafts&banner=13G8K602JGQPBGEGCX02&f=ifr&linkID=984dbcdcf1cb64febcb261091746c7c0&t=142904-20&tracking_id=142904-20‘ marketplace=’US’ link_id=’01c3a5d8-d390-11e7-ad8e-a3fafaec1c55′]

We Have a Winner!

It’s official, I can now be labeled a “Mr. Fancy Pants”. That’s because this weekend I won The Draconic Awards, Captain Con 2015 Best of Show trophy. Booyah baby! Thanks to everyone over at Wargamers Consortium for putting this event together. Up until the last moments before the announcement I didn’t expect such a fantastic result. It was a great experience and one that I look forward to doing again.

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Bad ass trophies and medals 🙂

Nomad Gecko by Corvus Belli

The Draconic Awards 2015, CaptainCon Best of Show

Warpwolf Stalker by Privateer Press

The Draconic Awards 2015, CaptainCon Silver Coin

Grissel Bloodsong by David Montalvan

The Draconic Awards 2015, CaptainCon Silver Coin

Would you like to enter a painting competition? The Draconic Awards is the place to go. The organizers are super cool, talented people and provide great feedback. And furthermore, those medals and trophy are bad ass!
I had a great time at CaptainCon. The organizers were able to do a lot with the space including a demo section, tournaments, role playing games and a board game room. It was a chill convention in a nice venue and I’m really looking forward to the next time. Now if you’ll excuse me, I have some painting to do.

Holy Rusted Metal!

Metal is hard to maintain. It get’s gritty, looses it’s luster, accumulates rust and eventually falls apart but that’s why we love it. It grows character with age. In this post I’ll cover my technique for painting my favorite of all metals, the rusted kind. Come sit, and paint with me.

Rust1Firstly, I designed these 55mm bases for use on some of my Infinity models. By using sheets of platicard, corrugated cardboard, aluminum wire, and even a BIC pen, I was able to create an industrial look. I highly recommend trying this project out to any hobbyist. Just go nuts and have fun.

Rust2Once the bases were built I spray painted them using Army Painter’s Platemail Metal. It’s not the best surface to paint on being that it’s so glossy, so I also sprayed a coat of clear matte varnish over it.

Rust3Next is a heavy wash of P3’s Battledress Green. I like to mix in a little bit of Liquitex’s Flo-Aid to keep the paint flowing a bit more evenly.

 Rust4Another wash of P3’s Battledress Green. This time I try to focus more on the recesses.
Rust5Here I applied a heavy dry-brush of Citadel’s Iron Breaker to help bring back the shiny. Rust6To create that signature reddish rust color I applied a wash of P3’s Bloodstone. Once again focusing on the recesses and crevasses.  Rust7To add more contrast and grit, I carefully applied a wash of Citadel’s Agrax Earthshade. Rust8Next I used a careful application of RMSP’s Brown Liner. This helps define the edges and enhance the details. Rust9 Finally, I go back with some Citadel Iron Breaker using a fine detail brush to pick out some of the edges of the metal. I also painted the sheets of “paper” on the base using some browns and tans.
See, not too shabby looking and not very difficult to do. Try this out on your metals. You can easily apply these techniques to any metal color. Perhaps patinated copper, or burnished brass. Thanks for reading and happy painting!

What’s in the Box?

Nomad-1

Salyut Zond, Gecko Squad, Tsyklon Sputnik

Hello there fellow tabletop gamers (there’s one inside us all). Recently, I posted this image onto Wargamers Consortium-Infinity, a great Facebook group moderated by a friend of mine, Nestor Medina. Big shout out homie! To kickoff the new group WGC-I hosted a painting challenge, and these are my entries. However, this post isn’t going to be about the models, it’s going to be about the swanky crates you see in the background. What if I told you that for pennies a day you too can cover starving tabletops with terrain such as this? Well you can, and here’s how.

Here’s what you’ll need:
– Box cutter or X-Acto knife
– Corrugated paper
– Scissors
– Tape
– Paper glue
– Marker
– Cardboard granola bar or cereal box
ShippingCrate-Assembly21I’m not the most precise person when it comes to building terrain, which is why I like to use already made boxes as my underlying structure. Using this granola box I’ll be able to make two 2″ x 2″ x 6.5″ shipping crates with clean right angles.
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First, tape the open end closed. I can’t be the only person that destroys the packaging on these boxes when I open them. So that’s what the tape is for. 🙂
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Next, 2″ measurements along the long edges of the box. Two is an easy number to remember, and fits the 28mm scale of all my tabletop games nicely.
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Cutting time! Okay, so slicing into a box that’s already assembled can be dangerous and unstable, but I find it to be way faster than deconstructing, cutting then reconstructing it. All that being said, I always do several light passes with a very sharp blade. Also, cut only the long sides using a blade and then finish the shorter sides with a scissor. Don’t worry if this doesn’t look super neat and accurate. You can fix that later.
ShippingCrate-Assembly14ShippingCrate-Assembly13
I bought a 30″ x 20″ sheet of this corrugated paper from an art store for about 3 dollars. It’s great stuff and comes in several different colors. Since then, I’ve found it online for even cheaper.
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ShippingCrate-Assembly9
After cutting the paper into 2″ long strips I glue them onto the sides of the crate using paper craft glue. Turn the box top-side down onto your table. This’ll help keep the edges of the paper flush to the top of your crate. Then cut off the excess flap of paper with a scissor.
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Do the same fro the top of your crate, and you’re almost done with construction!
Next I sliced a few .5″ stips of cereal box card.
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Add some glue along the top edges of the box…
ShippingCrate-Assembly3
…and along the strips of card.
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Then snip off the excess.
ShippingCrate-Assembly1
And there you have the final constructed product. Now this is a very simple concept, but you can do all kinds of interesting stuff using these simple techniques. Perhaps you’d like to add doors to your crate, or use this idea on bigger boxes to make entire buildings? Do your thing and have fun. 🙂
ShippingCrate-Assembly0In my next post I’ll show you how to paint this bad boy up and add detail using stencils and posters. Thanks for reading and happy building!

Repeat After Me: All Done!

The EVO repeater is complete! The final green details were done using a base coat of P3’s Necrotite Green/Morrow White (50/50) followed by a wash of Necrotite Green and finally a dot of Morrow White. I also used the  Necrotite Green wash for the outer glow.

EVO-Final1

Nomad Salyut Zond EVO Repeater

EVO-Final2

Nomad Salyut Zond EVO Repeater

What Zond would be complete with out a hacker to control it? None I tell ya! So here we have a Alguacil Hacker, looking all sexy-nice with here green haired self.

Hacker2

Alguacil Hacker

Hacker1

Alguacil Hacker

Yes I know she has no eyes, but I was tired. But I don’t wanna. Fine, it looks like i have some eyes to paint. TTYL

Repeat After Me: Blue!

Hello again fellow lover of cool things! In my last post I explained the steps I took to paint orange on this very cool EVO repeater. Let’s continue now with the color blue. Or is that aqua? Whatever, just follow my lead. 🙂

EVO-Blue1

First we start with the base-coat. I think this is the most important step when painting a model. It’s like building a house; you need a solid and even foundation or else the rest of it goes to shit. So take your time, keep your paint smooth and thin (like milk) and listen to your favorite podcast.

EVO-Blue2

Next up is shading with a wash of Deep Ocean. As you can tell in the picture, I’m a bit messy with this step. It’s all good tho because in the next I cleaned it up and smoothed it out. That could be an R. Kelly song.

EVO-Blue3

Here’s where I tried smoothing the blend between the base-coat color and the shade color. I used a mix of Deep Ocean/Marine Teal (60/40) and watered them down with a mix of H2O/Flo-Aid (20/1) to create a wash. Then I used this wash to smooth out the middle area between the two colors.

Note: These Reaper Master Series Paints have a really nice quality pigment; great for washes and layered blends.

EVO-Blue4

Highlights with Surf Aqua. The contrast is a little too stark for my taste. Let’s fix that…

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…with another wash of Deep Ocean/Marine Teal. That’s better!

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And then I redid the highlight a little thinner. Nicey nice, with beans and rice!

On to the next color: WHITE!